Marla Dietz

Marla Dietz
Marla Dietz, '13 MA, PCCI, School of Education, Master of Arts in Counseling, PPS/LPCC Track

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE THAT YOU ARE PROUD OF?

In the summer of 2013 I began working at a local non-profit organization that specializes in treating victims of abuse and trauma, as well as assisting in the rehabilitation of perpetrators of child abuse and domestic violence. Each and every day I step into my office, I have the opportunity to provide support and guidance that can have a life changing effect on my clients. My current role has me working at a high school where I provide crisis intervention, short-term therapy and group therapy to the students. Each day brings new clients and crises that require quick intervention and referral. I am proud to say that in my short time as a therapist, I’ve worked with hundreds of clients, providing them with intervention and treatment to aid in their recovery of abuse, trauma, depression, anxiety and suicide ideation and attempt.

HOW HAS YOUR WORK MADE AN IMPACT ON YOUR COMMUNITY, SCHOOL, AGENCY, CLASSROOM, CLIENTS, OR STUDENTS?

 My clients live in the communities of Hawthorne, Lawndale and Inglewood, cities within minutes of LMU. I find great joy working in these neighboring communities, knowing that the need is great and that my work makes a difference in my clients’ lives. I entered the helping profession for a reason, and I hope to continue to give to my local communities in years to come. I am so proud of the progress I have made as a clinician. I truly enjoy driving to work each morning, knowing that my work is important, essential, and life-changing, which is why it also defines who I am. I am eager to make a change in the world. Every day I use my therapeutic skills change lives.

WHAT EVIDENCE CAN YOU SHARE THAT DEMONSTRATES THIS IMPACT?

The program I work on for the local high schools is funded by my work and the school district, provided at no charge to the families. Students can be referred at any time by school administration for crisis intervention, regardless of a family’s insurance or financial status. For students in short term individual or group treatment, services continue to be offered at no charge to the families. In the 2016-2017 fall semester, I saw over 150 students in direct services. I continue to provide treatment to many of those students, in addition to others who have since been referred.  

I probably could not have predicted where my career path would take me years ago, but I thank my education and experiences granted to me during my time at LMU for the clinician that I have become today.